"Dedicated To The Winners & The Losers..." - Raekwon


Thursday, October 16, 2008

What The Hell Ever Happened To Eminem?

"Dude."

You know, what honestly gets to me about this Dwayne Carter “Best Rapper Alive” bullshit? (You know besides everything…) He’s not the first rapper to get erroneously crowned this title by white rock critics and the fifteen year old girls of the world. Oh how we soon forget Charles Barkley but in my day, there was another controversial weirdo-outsider (and associated with the Outsidaz) rapper making the rounds of the hip hop world expanding the definition of being an emcee, courting mainstream acceptance and selling one million records in their first week. His name was Marshall Bruce Mathers III, perhaps you’ve heard of him…and let me tell you something, Mr. Carter, you are no Eminem.

For a period of my life between the ages of fifteen and twenty, Eminem was my favorite rapper on the planet and it wasn’t even remotely close. Sure, I loved Jay-Z, Nas and Wu-Tang Clan (and let’s not forget about the understated glories of Skee-Lo’s “I Wish”) as much as a righteous fan of “real” hip hop should but they paled in comparison to the Pale Motor Mouth of Motor City. Perhaps, it was my severe case of melanin deficiency or my penchant for attracting bullies as if my real name was B.J. (but you can call me the Good Doctor Zeus, motherfuckers…) but Eminem spoke me to in ways that only Kurt Cobain and George Lucas could even dream of. Here was a rapper that looked like me, that rapped like nobody I had ever heard before, and was the funniest, sharpest dude holding a sword in the game. I was hooked the second that he brazenly declared that “he’d fuck anything that walks” the first time I heard “My Name Is…” For a white teenage rap fan growing up in the suburbs, Eminem was like Jesus Christ (or Larry Bird take your pick, really…) descending from the heavens to give us white people of the world, a messianic figure to worship and add legitimacy to people that had long written off white rap fans as tragic, Jamie Kennedy clones. Marshall Mathers was revolutionary.

And best of all, he really was that damn good. Eminem did something unique that no other white artist had ever done before in any medium. He was able to channel the experience of being white in America explicitly and coherently (something that always been taken as a given in American culture, as “the mainstream” America generally treats being white as “normal””…whatever the fuck that means… and thus not particularly interesting) in a manner that was simultaneously extremely uncomfortable and inherently relatable to white teenagers. I’ve always subscribed to the notion that every culture commentator who ever tried to explain why “white kids love rap” are inherently completely full of shit. White kids aren’t trying to be any more rebellious towards their parents by bumping Public Enemy than they would be than bumping the Clash or even Jimi Hendrix. White kids like rap music for the same reason they like anything. They like rap music because their friends like rap music and because it’s on T.V. Period. End of discussion. Any other reason speaks to the culture biases of the commentator and lack of understanding of the basic notion of youth than anything. Kids like shit because they like the shit they like. It’s the world that makes the things they like weird or rebellious. However despite the basic truth or perhaps because of it, it’s really hard to define just how beautiful and therapeutic for somebody like myself to have Eminem dominating the rap world like they did. It's just nice to know sometimes you ain't alone in this crazy, twisted planet.

Eminem's first three major label albums (and even his underrated underground debut, "Infinite") are three of this decade's defining and most iconic albums. "The Slim Shady LP" is a trippy, mind-warped ode to sex, drugs and murder armed with some of Dre's most inventive beats and Em's razor sharp black humor and wit that makes it in my mind, the funniest album ever recorded. The first time I heard the album was a defining experience for me in more than one ways. First, it was the first album that I obtained by less than "legal" manners. My best friend, Matt, sold me the bootleg that he burned for five dollars and I can remember feeling like this was the future. It didn’t seem wrong to me that I was getting an illegal copy of a music. After all, I wasn’t stealing a “real” copy from a store. I was merely trading for digital information stored on a hard drive. That didn’t seem wrong. Listening to the “Slim Shady LP” for the first time was unlike anything I heard before. Eminem was crass, rude, ultra foul-mouthed, dirty and he would say the things that you were thinking in the back of your head out loud. It was fucking brilliant. By the time, he released both “The Marshall Mathers LP” and “The Eminem Show”, I was convinced that Marshall Mathers was the most important artist of his generation and nobody came close. People forget but Eminem wasn’t all about dick jokes and songs about raping his mother. Em spoke about things and spoke about them candidly and often uncomfortably. He spoke about freedom of speech, crazed, psychotic fans, domestic violence, the murders at Columbine, his “alleged” homophobia and he came directly at his detractors with more ammunition than they came at him. And he became the biggest music star on the planet because of it… I could not have worshipped the guy more if I dyed my hair blonde, kidnapped my pregnant girlfriend, and drove her over a cliff with her in the trunk of my car.

And then he met Curtis Jackson and it all came murderously crashing down…. Like everybody, I was caught up in the hype of 50 Cent when he first came onto the scene. He was the hot new protégé of my favorite rapper and one of the greatest producers of the time and had a pedigree that was simply way too mind boggling for my prurient adolescent mind. (After all, he was shot nine times! Nine fucking times! How gangsta is that! Obviously, his music is genius because of it and in absolutely no way derivative of much more talented and original emcees. I mean clearly his realness is for us to behold. I mean, at least, he’s more real than Ja Rule no matter what that bitch J-Lo says!) After Eminem met 50 Cent, he soon became obsessed with his own gangsta and the next thing we know he’s talking about how he’s a soldier, beefing with Ja Rule and Benzino, and getting way too self serious about his life.. Soon “Encore” happened and it destroyed the last shred of credibility that he had in my eyes. “Encore” is not just a bad record. It’s a horrific, unlikable, unmitigated disaster of the highest proportions. The first time I heard it, I was convinced that Eminem was making a really bad comedy concept album that I didn’t get the joke on. The record featured too much of Eminem’s legendarily shitty self-production and it had way too many songs that blatantly chased the old Slim Shady formula but way grosser and less funny. There were records about puppet sex, puking, and the size of his dick and those were the “highlights” of an otherwise unlistenable record. I remember thinking to myself that Eminem could not possibly be serious with this record. It seemed as if he was making record that was purposely horrific as if to shed the massive attention that followed him everywhere he goes. Nothing could possibly be this bad on purpose. And then he disappeared from the map…

I don’t know if it was the grief from his long-time best friend and mentor’s death, Proof, or his addiction to drugs, or the dissolution of his marriage but it’s been a long time since we heard anything of note from Eminem. We haven’t heard a new song, a freestyle, a mixtape, or an ill-conceived collaboration with Coldplay from Mr. Mathers in years! Jay-Z retired and un-retired, released two albums, and generally completely demolished his credibility in the time that Eminem has been unofficiall gone from the hip hop world. There were rumors that he ballooned to three hundred plus pounds and was dangerously suicidal. If Jay-Z and Nas were aging completely ungracefully than Eminem was completely self-destructing. As for me, I completely forgot about Eminem. I grew up and my tastes evolved and solidified to the point where a new Eminem record barely peaks my interest. Earlier this week, Eminem released his first new song off the upcoming “Relapse” entitled “I’m Having A Relapse” and I couldn’t be less interested. The song, itself, is pretty harmless Slim Shady-era ode to drugs and it features this weird sinister Middle Eastern influenced beat and Eminem does his old routine of using weird voices to color his legendarily flow. This would normally be fine but it sounds dated and forced. I don’t know if I’ve grown up or Eminem’s completely lost it but it sounds completely out of place in 2008. As much as, I would like to see Eminem return to form, I feel that this might not be a good idea for Marshall Mathers to come back if he’s not going to be the same. Age and maturity has been the kryptonite of many a great rapper and for a rapper whose career was built upon being the most immature and childish rapper of all-time seeing an old and fat Eminem, waddling on stage, rapping about vicodin and kinky sex, maybe two traumatizing for words.

I hope I’m wrong, though. I hope Em can come back with an album that defies conventions and proves why so many of us thought he could be the greatest rapper of all-time when he was ripping it up ten years ago but something says that Eminem might be better served if he hung up the mic and make his self-implosed “retirement” official. He was once great but I don’t know if he can do that, again. The world sometimes passes us by and they need to learn to let go. It might be time for Eminem to stay gone.

37 comments:

tray said...

For a white teenage rap fan growing up in the suburbs, Eminem was like Jesus Christ (or Larry Bird take your pick, really…) descending from the heavens to give us white people of the world, a messianic figure to worship and add legitimacy to people that had long written off white rap fans as tragic, Jamie Kennedy clones...He was able to channel the experience of being white in America explicitly and coherently

Yeah, see I was a white teenage rap fan from the suburbs too, and I hated Eminem, while acknowledging his ridiculous talent. Few things. He didn't channel the experience of being white in America. He channeled the experience, maybe, of being poor and white and trashy in America. To my affluent Jewish ears, he was utterly foreign. Even more so than 50 or whoever, because at least I've seen people like him when I'm in North Philly. But I don't really know any white people who live in trailer parks; they just don't exist where I live or anywhere near where I live. Even white kids who "dress black" are pretty rare in my part of the suburbs. And no one I know would ever so much as be seen with a woman like Kim. So I could never relate at all. But besides that, I never looked at him as a real rapper. To me, he was a guy who took rock themes - bitching about your girlfriend, depression, suicide, hardcore drugs, what was said about him in the media - and rapped really well about that stuff. But that kind of stuff is the very reason I don't like rock in the first place. All the anger and angst and whining malcontent. You hit the nail on the head when you say that Eminem spoke to you in ways that Cobain and George Lucas could only dream of. I hate Star Wars and I hate Cobain. The one's nerdporn, the other's a pathetic loser. Rap, to me, is in a big way all about preserving the classic cowboys-in-Westerns masculinity that white pop culture left behind for Seth Rogen/Michael Cera/Kurt Cobain masculinity.

Jack said...

wow that was pretty powerful Tray. But I'm white and the same way. I'd have to agree really. (Also travel to philly a good bit)

tray said...

And I mean, no offense to you at all for liking the guy, he's an amazingly gifted rapper. But to me that stuff isn't hip-hop, it's punk that rhymes.

Guy Fawkes said...

I agree, Eminem was really successful at crossing over... his music was always loud and abrasive, more than quiet and introspective.
I think he's fell off the map, because he has nothing left to say...covered all the topics, we understand you don't like Kim.
And it would be good if he didn't make anymore music, or at least anymore "I'm having a relapse" or "Just Lose It"'s even though they would probably go platinum, I assume Eminem has more respect for the hip-hop world than that.

Marcus said...

This song proves my theory that Em is stuck.

He can't do anything other than the weirdo "I'll fuck my cousin and rape my mannequin" shit or the over-dramatic "My life is so fucked up and nobody cares" shit.

Gimmick. Talented gimmick, but still a gimmick

Jack said...

I agree with you guys. When Eminem started to fall off, I always told my friends "there is only so much Eminem can rap about: Drugs, Mom, Kim, Hayley, Trailor Parks, Detroit." When he milked all them for what they were worth, what else was there to talk about that was worthwhile? Cue for him to go off the deep end talkin about his weenie and puking.

The counter-arguement here is that isn't that what most black rappers from the projects do too? They all repeat the same shit album after album: Drugs, Money, Cars, Guns. But to me somehow, they manage to keep it fresh. That or since Eminem was the only one doing the white boy thing, you expected greatness everytime. I'll accept mediocrety from Jeezy or Game, as long as he give me a few bangers. (sorry for the Jeezy reference Doc).

I dunno that's how I feel. I'm not as well written as you fellas.

Jordan said...

Tray, I think you're right about how Eminem is sort of not really rap. I think this helped me to get into him, 'cause when first heard him I was 11 and not really into rap and overall kind of a bitchass. (And just a little bit away from an unfortunate Cobain obsession, the comparison is apt). The main difference with Eminem was was that he was really funny and angry and over the top and would directly engage his listeners in ways that no one else would.

But he started falling off pretty quick. The Marshall Mathers LP is a pretty good album with some great singles, but it's significantly worse than the Slim Shady LP. The Eminem show really only had a few good songs on it. I remember being really excited to see 8 mile when it came out, but thinking that he wasn't the rapper he once was at that point. By the time Encore came out, the singles were so bad I didn't even bother.

But Eminem didn't fall off because we are no longer consistently engaged by his subject matter, he fell off because he can barely get into it any more. Like if you listen to this new song and then listen to something like Guilty Conscience, there's no way you can deny that now he's totally disinterested and half-assing it now. Also that Jamaican accent is beyond idiotic.

Jay (d)eff Kay said...

agree w/ lot of the comments. I'm not white nor was i raised in the suburbs, so I dont know how much of the white experience he was able to embody. but i did really like those first two records. i thought he was able to channel young male angst through rebellion that wasn't rooted in poverty or the typical struggle of black experience that rappers usually spoke about. his anger wasn't rooted in political or social - it just was. it was lashing out in his own cartoonish, and creative manner. tray brought up a great point abt rap's "classic cowboys-in-Westerns masculinity" which is really just a version of pure, unabashed celebration of primitive, chest-thumping masculinity - and while a lot of people enjoy rap for the same reasons he does, tons of others related to eminem coz he was doing exactly the opposite. he probably addressed suburban angst and boredom in a way that not many others had even attempted before. but yeah it was unique brand that turned into a gimmick that painted itself into a corner. i really doubt it had much to do with 50's influence. em really relished provoking his audience and by the time encore was out, his template of 'im gonna narrate my frustrations in overtly garish day dreams' had become predictable. and the whole bit of going against the media and society for attacking him had become pointless coz he was receiving widespread accolades by then.

In addition to him getting sloppy, i really think we just got severely tired of the formula, and the break was well deserved. Even if he did come back with the same schtick, it'd seem a little fresh since he's been gone for awhile

again doc just like the kanye review, i think its way too early to be judging this record. the relapse single was alright. far from terrible. doesnt seem like he just lost it (ha-hah-hah-ha, go crazy, oh baby). I'm an optimist.

africanorigins said...

Eminem still has the ill flow that I liked. I always thought Marshall was ill because he didn't sound like anybody else. But to be honest I was never into him when he was talking that 'I wanna rape my own mother' shit. When he was not exaggerating in his eccentricity I loved his music. Because whether I could relate or not, introspection always appealed to me. Because let's face it, it's not cool in mainstream rap to express your vulnerabilities or weaknesses(maybe topic for another time).

The new freestyle has the flow but sounds just like that bullshit he was rapping about on Encore. Yeah he always puts out some stupid single the album which contains serious subject matter. But I just hope that's what he's doing here. I mean he was my favorite rapper for some time too. One of the greats, but I never thought he was the best ever.

MCH said...

In all fairness, Encore did have some dope tracks:
Never Enough
Yellow Brick Road
Like Toy Soldiers
Rain Man
Spend Some Time.

But where he stays very goofy like Ass Like That, its just terrible. I'm hoping he can make a succesful comeback because I used to think he was the greatest as well.

MCH said...

Oh and he didn't just "disappear from the map". He released Curtain Call at the end of 05 which had a couple new tracks (all of which sucked besides When I'm Gone which was decent). He also released The Re-Up at the end of 06 which was very uneven but had a GREAT song with No Apologies.

Raph said...

"...seeing an old and fat Eminem, waddling on stage, rapping about vicodin and kinky sex, maybe two traumatizing for words."

it's too traumatizing for words, not to be a snob

Jesus Shuttlesworth said...

"Rap, to me, is in a big way all about preserving the classic cowboys-in-Westerns masculinity that white pop culture left behind for Seth Rogen/Michael Cera/Kurt Cobain masculinity."

as a black person who loves star wars, this is as good point. but only to an extent. someone like devin or, i don't know, ultramagnetic do not fit this idea at all. rap certainly isn't about showing off how you are socially awkward or insecure. it's about realizing that and protecting yourself from vulnerability to try and stay stable.

also, i have plenty of affluent jewish friends from the area near where you live, tray, and they loved eminem just as much as dre or g-unit.

"
The counter-arguement here is that isn't that what most black rappers from the projects do too?"

true, but most of eminem's most popular song topics are so insular that hearing them over and over again becomes a pain in the ass. with any 8 rappers from atlanta who rap about the trap, you get 8 different experiences. they don't all rap about hating the same woman. and that way they create a community from their music based on a (supposedly) shared experience. with em, it's only about him. think about the guest appearances on his first couple albums. they're really all concept songs (except for bitch please II) b/c none of the rappers he hangs with have ever dealt with his family.

tray said...

as a black person who loves star wars, this is as good point. but only to an extent. someone like devin or, i don't know, ultramagnetic do not fit this idea at all. rap certainly isn't about showing off how you are socially awkward or insecure. it's about realizing that and protecting yourself from vulnerability to try and stay stable.

also, i have plenty of affluent jewish friends from the area near where you live, tray, and they loved eminem just as much as dre or g-unit.


Oh sure, affluent Jewish kids love Eminem, it's not that we categorically can't stand ex-trailer-trash rappers. I'm just saying that he doesn't embody the "white experience," he embodies a particular part that's very foreign to me. Which wouldn't prevent me from enjoying his work if he wasn't such an angry little bitch.

And about Devin, or take even De La, they're not thugs, but they're not rapping about what losers they are either. Devin portrays himself as a player, albeit one who gets high way too much, but still a player. Same with De La, they were a lot more human and down-to-earth than Kane or someone like that, but there was still a certain cockiness going on there. None of what I'm saying, just to be clear, is really intended as criticism of Em, I just felt that Doc gave this kind of overbroad take on how all white kids loved Eminem because he spoke to their lifestyle, was the rapping equivalent of Cobain/Larry Bird, etc, when some white kids disliked him for those very reasons. I mean, I never even liked Bird much, and I hate Steve Nash.

Jesus Shuttlesworth said...

" I mean, I never even liked Bird much, and I hate Steve Nash."

a) i get the feeling more and more we're of a similar age, so how could you hate bird that much when he stopped playing in '92 (i was six)?

b) nash is canadian (as are rogen and cera, though i love arrested development), so i can see a method to the hate.

tray said...

No, I say I never liked Bird much. I am probably your age, and never saw him play, but from what I've seen of him on ESPN Classic, I don't get the adoration. It's a little disturbing to me when white kids fall in love with "unathletic" white players because now they can imagine themselves in the NBA, and then we get into this whole "Cerebral White Player X got by on his smarts and toughness, Black Players Y and Z and Q could just jump really high" discourse that starts to seem kind of racist. Nash isn't smarter than other players, he just has innate shooting ability, quick reflexes, and great peripheral vision. It's just a different kind of athleticism.

DocZeus said...

I'm not saying Eminem speaks to all white people. Hell, I know a fair amount of white people that loathe Eminem. My life resembles very little what Eminem's life does. I'm saying that he spoke about being white (even if it was being poor and white) that nobody really had touched upon. And he was able to do it because his medium is something dominated by people who aren't in fact white.

Rap treats whiteness as an "other" in the same manner most other forms of art treat "blackness" as an "other." That's what makes his work so interesting.

Personally, he spoke to me because he was nerdy, felt extremely alienated and had anger issues which could aptly describe at the age of 15.

jules_winnfield said...

Eminem was also my favorite rapper circa junior high. In fact, he was the artist who got me into rap to begin with. I am white, but really can not relate to Em lyrically, yet I still felt a really strong connection with him, so its sad for me to see his precipitous downfall. Lyrically and musically, Encore straight up sucked. The dude can still flow though, he just raps about retarded shit all the time now.

Anonymous said...

*stops reading after third paragraph*

Hold up. Doc, you're white??!

*goes back to reading*

JustChad

DocZeus said...

JustChad-

Well I prefer to think of myself as an entity, I suppose the world would suggest I'm white.

rm said...

First, I think Eminem talked more about being white the more people talked about him being white, so I can't blame him for that, his hand was forced in large extent. I think he was fine with his race, having worked those issues out long ago as the outsider where he grew up. I always saw him mainly just laughing and marveling at how it had made him kind of a novelty to many even when he was really just a great rapper who had worked hard to get there.

Tray, something about what you wrote really irritates me. Wh**e Tr*sh is the same as the n-word in my book, and you sound like a snob who is fetishizing one foreign experience while denigrating another, while not really appreciating that a lot of what an Eminem and your "classic cowboys-in-Westerns masculinity" you seem to wish you could be go through is pretty similar. That is just wrong, and you are listening to whatever you listen to for the wrong reasons in my opinion.

Oh, and I can never be mad at Eminiem, because that line "something, something, something, I get weeded/my daughter scribbled over that rhyme, I couldn't read it" from "Anyman" is my favorite ending to a rapping-with-no-purpose verse I've heard.

tray said...

"Tray, something about what you wrote really irritates me. Wh**e Tr*sh is the same as the n-word in my book, and you sound like a snob who is fetishizing one foreign experience while denigrating another, while not really appreciating that a lot of what an Eminem and your "classic cowboys-in-Westerns masculinity" you seem to wish you could be go through is pretty similar. That is just wrong, and you are listening to whatever you listen to for the wrong reasons in my opinion."

Well, I definitely am somewhat bigoted about class, and I don't know how apologetic I am about that. When a person receives abysmal education, is raised in shabby environs, eats crappy food, he or she often is the worse for it. And it's not their fault, and it's unfortunate, and something should be done about the abysmal education part, but that doesn't make me like such people. I can't help but be a snob and dislike girls with cheap shoes and handbags, people with bad taste in movies and Chinese food, people who unironically read trashy drugstore novels and like Sarah Palin. It isn't their fault that their parents didn't instill them with good taste, but you can't spend your life imagining what people would've been like if not for their misfortunes. Now, as for fetishizing foreign experiences, yeah, there's some of that. But ultimately I think that listening to Mobb Deep is like reading Jane Austen. You don't read Austen because of some fascination with the lives of the rich, aristocratic and idle, you read her, to put it really crudely, for the experiences and emotions that you have in common with her characters. Similarly, people like Mobb Deep because everyone, in their own lives, is struggling to survive and negotiate in a dangerous world in some way or another. All lives are 'trife.' The specifics add color, they're what makes them good writers, but they're not primarily why I listen.

padraig said...

what a shock. Tray is a bourgeois snob*. which I mean, whatever, I am too, though I try not to be. either way, Tray, I think you're kind of missing the point. I'm not suggesting you "apologize" for your views on class etc. but the problem is the structural defects that give birth to the shite environment/education situation you describe, not the people themselves (although perhps that's what you were alluding to?). and, yes, everyone has to take responsibility for their own lives, but the wildly unlevel playing field kinda supercedes everything a lot of the time.

as far as Eminem, I was never a big fan, it's kind of nuts to hear people suggesting his music "wasn't hip hop". not even on that reversal of the Other thing, either. I mean, dude came up with the Outsidaz. that's about as hip hop as it gets. I can see that argument about him as an entity/cultural force, but not his actual music. it's pretty silly as well that him being this emblem/token eclipsed all other white rappers & reduced them to a punchline but shit's really on the media, though I guess dude was complicit in his own self-branding.

I guess it's a little bit sad to see such a smart rapper (even if he used that intelligence to say some hella, hella dumb stuff) fall off so hard, but hey.

Jonah said...

This post characterizes exactly how I felt and feel about Eminem and I think it's a pretty common feeling for white kids who love rap, whether they are suburban, jewish, whatever. The first albums I ever bought were Chronic 2001 and The Marshall Mathers Lp, and while I liked Chronic, I LOVED the Eminem and listened to it all the time. Eight years later, I don't know what the fuck I was thinking and can't even get back into the same mindset. Em's flow was sick on that album and songs like "The Way I Am' and "Criminal" seemed like the best things ever made. I go back to those songs now and hear an angry prick with a bad sense of humor. His flow will always be on point, but I feel that a large portion of Eminem's audience just grew up to like better rap music and there's not much he can do to appeal to us anymore. Then again, we're probably not his demographic anymore. I'm sure 11 year old white kids would like this freestyle or an album of songs just like it. And yeah Encore shattered my world, I was waiting for that album like I'm waiting for the Wale album now and it was the most disheartening thing I'd ever heard.

Jonah said...

and how the fuck do you equate white trash with nigger? The comparison isn't even close.

Raoul said...

I am from suburban Detroit and I loathe Em. Personally Buck 65 spoke to me, inferior rapper that he is, he mines his own beats, (which are amazing) and he covers a wider array of topics. Em just always came off like other stupid white guys from around Detroit did, misogynistic and dumb.

gorapsgo said...

I agree with a lot of what Jonah said there, a lot of the humor and stuff used by eminem in his earlier stuff is just not funny to a large portion of his fan base anymore. I was, maybe 11 when the Slim Shady LP came out, and for the lognest time thought it was funny as hell but a lot of it is garbage to me now. The relapse record is kinda the same, not bad lyrically with how it sounds, and the multi's and the general slickness of the words, but he is talking about retarted shit., that is just not funny the way it used to be.

This is why I think the eminem show is his best album. Its his most mature album, and at a time when he still gave a fuck lyrically. Also his flow is starting to become the best in the biz the way it still is. His flow was average at best IMO on the Slim Shady LP.



Also to people who think he never talked about anything worthwhile, I tend to disagree, as songs like "rock Bottom" (Great song, not mentioned enough) and a large portion of the emeinem show "white america" as one, show more versatility then a lot of people give him credit for.

gorapsgo said...

I agree with a lot of what Jonah said there, a lot of the humor and stuff used by eminem in his earlier stuff is just not funny to a large portion of his fan base anymore. I was, maybe 11 when the Slim Shady LP came out, and for the lognest time thought it was funny as hell but a lot of it is garbage to me now. The relapse record is kinda the same, not bad lyrically with how it sounds, and the multi's and the general slickness of the words, but he is talking about retarted shit., that is just not funny the way it used to be.

This is why I think the eminem show is his best album. Its his most mature album, and at a time when he still gave a fuck lyrically. Also his flow is starting to become the best in the biz the way it still is. His flow was average at best IMO on the Slim Shady LP.



Also to people who think he never talked about anything worthwhile, I tend to disagree, as songs like "rock Bottom" (Great song, not mentioned enough) and a large portion of the emeinem show "white america" as one, show more versatility then a lot of people give him credit for.

tray said...

Yeah, padraig, structural inequalities are definitely a biggie (I thought I got at that, but maybe I wasn't clear). But like, just because I understand that a girl was brought up in an environment of abject low-middle-classness and therefore doesn't know any better but to walk around with those disgusting paisley Vera Bradley pocketbooks, doesn't mean that I can't still despise her for her bad taste. Like it's not so much the fact of being so poor that you can't afford anything better but to live in a trailer that I dislike "trailer trash" for - that would be flat-out classism - it's the accoutrements that go with living in the trailer (or the accoutrements that I imagine go with living in the trailer, my notions of what such people are like are basically formed from youtube videos of people at Palin rallies).

Anonymous said...

It's crazy to seem like Eminem first started big 10 years ago now. The one guy on here posted that he was in junior high when he first started listening to Eminem - and now he's probably finished college himself.
Yikes, where has the time gone. I feel like I'm still stuck in the same time warp and nothing much has changed in my life since Eminem first started rapping, but it's already been a decade. Time to get a move on in my life.

Anonymous said...

holy shit man this article was on point. F lil wayne, eminem is still alive.

I grew up on eminem and damn I agree with every point on here. I Even had a copy of infinite back in the day. And I agree, Em should hang up the mic now, before he does too much damage.

Corey said...

Not to kiss too much ass but this article says exactly what I have been thinking since the release of Encore. I was the biggest Em fan on the planet and Encore seemed like an accident or a joke. It just didnt make sense. I think it was the Marshall Mathers LP where he stated that he could never top what hes already done. The problem in The Eminem Show was incredibly clever and one of the most lyrical albums of all time. I am willing to cut some slack for the Proof saga but Encore was before all that. I used to search high and low for new Em cuts. Now friends that now how big a fan I was will ask if I heard the new jam and they are blown away when I tell them I didnt even know he had one out.

Most importantly..... what is with that STUPID ASS VOICE and the PUPPETS! you know the voice:

"I aint got no legs, or ...nor brain...nice to meet you...hi, my name is.....I forgot my name...."

I wish him the best and would buy another album on release date but I would be terrified.

For now Atmosphere will do the trick with a little Big L, Talib, Common, and Jack Johnson.

Maybe I just got old? or Maybe Fifty sucks?

Anonymous said...

You guys need to chill and stop busting on him for makin a comeback.. his new cd is amazing and the fact that he falls of a little doesent mean u give up as far as im concerned you who wrote the article you arent a fan if u give up on him.. he releases one song from his new album nd ur gonna jump all over him. i understand his old shit was better but his new shit can be pretty good to he still has it.

Natalie said...

Eminem started rapping about things that were getting 'too close' to the government- I believe his life and that of his family have been threatened- watch his 'Mosh' music video- he was getting on a few too many nerves of some very powerful people. Do your research- Watch the Ring of Power-Empire of the City

Anonymous said...

are you guys kidding me...eminem has nothing left/cant rap about anything else besides drugs and shit, please for fuck sakes...eminem is like a fucking dictionary and can rap about anything, this is his style..in his albums he shows he can be serious and just joke around and make fun of people...he should just not rap anymore??? for fuck sakes give me a break...are you going to tell kobe bryant that we are sick of his threes and has nothing left..cmon...eminem still and will always beable to go up against any rapper in the game no doubt...are you going to tell other rappers nowadays that can only rap about getting money and bitches they should just stop rapping...seriously ITS EMINEM thats what he does..and you should still love it..PEACE

Anonymous said...

Hi Im new here.
Interesting discussion until I read this

"But like, just because I understand that a girl was brought up in an environment of abject low-middle-classness and therefore doesn't know any better but to walk around with those disgusting paisley Vera Bradley pocketbooks, doesn't mean that I can't still despise her for her bad taste."

Congratulations for being the most shallow person I found on the internet today! Thank you!

Anonymous said...

For someone to say that Eminem is running out of ideas, he made music so different that most others want what he has. Eminem is a real rapper because he doest rap about drugs or money, he raps about life.
With fame comes a lot of money and with money people can do stupid things, which is what exactly what he did.
It happens with every major music artist. Take Michael Jackson for example.
He is back an he is here to stay and is producing the best albums yet.
He is doing something that he loves and he is doing it for his fans. Us.